Public Sector

Office spaces are evolving. Digital transformation has brought about significant changes in the way people want to receive their services. Along with the expectation of faster, easier to use and more secure systems.  This shift to a digital workplace allows you and your employees to work more flexibly, effectively and efficiently. And by enabling data to flow more smoothly between departments, working in silos will become a thing of the past. 

Implementing cloud technology gives you access to simple, shared on-demand computing resources. And by moving to a 'cloud first' strategy you improve your service delivery, increase collaboration and deliver agility. You and your teams will have improved access to your information and applications for your increasingly on-the-move workforce. Other benefits include significantly reducing your hardware procurement and maintenance costs, free-ing up valuable office space. 

We understand the specific IT requirements and challenges of public sector organisations, from our experience working with local and central government departments, education establishments, NHS and emergency services. Following the launch of our Managed IT services offering, public sector organisations are making us a key technology partner at the heart of their digital transformation strategies. Helping us to build a strong reputation as more than just a digital print and managed content services provider.
 

University of Aberdeen

The University of Aberdeen on how their digital vision and strategy for print and document management is supported by their Konica Minolta print fleet. Allowing their staff and students to choose where they want to work and where they pick up documents. Whilst providing their IT team with greater control over their print fleet.

News

News
Print security mistakes that are damaging your organisation

Print security mistakes that are damaging your organisation

Global headlines highlight the crippling costs of corporate security breaches and 72% of companies say they recognise the implications of operating an insecure print infrastructure[1] – yet public and private sector organisations are still failing...